Category Archives: Music

Rapper Bobby Shmurda cops seven year plea deal in gang conspiracy case – He was facing 25 to life

Rapper Bobby Shmurda of the “Shmoney Dance” fame takes seven-year plea deal in gang conspiracy case

Prosecutors maintained Ackquielle Pollard, aka ‘Bobby Shmurda’, was the “driving force” behind GS9, a street crew  responsible for several shootings in Brooklyn, NY

Charged with conspiracy to commit murder and assault, weapons possession, reckless endangerment and criminal use of drug paraphernalia.

The 21-year-old musician was facing 25 years to life

Shmurda and his GS9 crew members, Alex “A-Rod” Crandon and Rashid “Rasha” Derissant will be serving a combined 158 1/2 years for gang-banging

Bobby Shmurda1.jpgFour months before his arrest, Rapper Bobby Shmurda  was on top of the world having just caught his break
Rapper Bobby Shmurda who once claimed that the cops who busted him on a felony gun charge targeted him and his friends because they’re black, pled  guilty to his role in a gang conspiracy and will be heading behind bars for seven years.

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Earlier in the trial Bobby claimed in court docs that cops have had it out for him because of his anti-police raps … adding the very same officers who arrested him in 2014 harassed him and his friends before.
Shmurda, whose real name is Ackquielle Pollard, took the deal just days before he was set to stand trial for conspiracy in Manhattan Supreme Court.
Prosecutors maintained the “Shmoney Dance” phenom was the “driving force” behind a street crew called called GS9 that was responsible for several shootings in Brooklyn.
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Shmurda in court during the trial. Shmurda and his crew members Alex “A-Rod” Crandon and Rashid “Rasha” Derissant, members of this GS9 crew will be serving a combined 158 1/2 years for murder
in 2014 When Bobby Shmurda, at 20-year-old was responsible for 102 million YouTube views, a $2 million record deal and the international “Shmoney Dance” craze. became one of 16 members of the East Brooklyn gang  GS9  to go on trial for Conspiracy, weapons possession and second-degree murder.
Shmurda in an interview with Billboard from the Manhattan Detention Complex  where he was to spend two years because he could not afford the bail said;
“When I see the judge and the DA, I just see a bunch of people trying to take my life away for being blessed,” said Shmurda, “When I look at them, it looks like a bunch of haters.”
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Four months earlier Shmurda’s track “Hot Boy” reached the top 10 on the Billboard Hot 100.
“Everything felt like the best moment of my life,” Shmurda says. “Everything.”
In the early hours of  Dec. 17, 2014 nine days after the rap artist appeared on Jimmy Kimmel Live! to promote his ‘Shmurda She Wrote EP,’ cops interrupted his recording session at Times Square’s Quad Studios. simultaneously Police rounded up 15 GS9 members, including Shmurda’s older brother, Javase.
According to police reports, officers also seized 10 weapons in the sweep, along with a small quantity of crack.
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Shmurda – grace to grass: Social media made him famous overnight, it also turned the searchlight on a life he says he was trying to escape. It brought him and his crew to the attention of the cops
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The rapper made his name from the music video Hot N****. sat in jail since 2014 awaiting trial on drugs and weapons charges. He took a plea just before he went on trial
The NYPD and Special Narcotics Prosecutor’s Office handed out indictments to the gang members based on a year-long investigation that accused GS9 members of 101 counts, including conspiracy, second-degree murder (for a 2013 bodega shooting), attempted murder (for a 2014 shooting that struck an innocent bystander) and reckless endangerment (for June gunfire outside a Brooklyn barbershop).
NYPD Commissioner William Bratton said GS9 stood for “G-Stone Crips” adding, “This gang … gloated about murder, shooting and drug-dealing in YouTube videos and viral dance moves.”
Police maintained that “the driving force behind the GS9 gang and organizing figure within this particular conspiracy” was one Ackquille Pollard, aka Bobby Shmurda.  Prosecutors charged Shmurda with conspiracy to commit murder and assault, weapons possession, reckless endangerment and criminal use of drug paraphernalia. While the prosecution has not identified a GS9 hierarchy, it says his “status” made others defer to him.

Acquille Pollard aka Bobby Shmurda took the deal just days before he was set to stand trial for conspiracy in Manhattan Supreme Court.
 Shmurda took the deal just days before he was set to stand trial for conspiracy in Manhattan Supreme Court.

“That shit is bullshit,” insists Shmurda. Asked about the charges, he says, “Bullshit.” He offers, “I come from a bad neighborhood. They’re upset that somebody my age made it out and is making so much money.”
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Pollard spent the entire trial period in jail, unable to make bail which had been set at $2 million, the same amount as his Epic contract.
After the fixed seven-year term, Shmurda will be on probation for five years, according to the terms of the plea agreement worked out with the Special Narcotics Prosecutor’s office.
Shmurda allegedly headed the trigger-happy GS9 crew that took on other Brooklyn gangs and ran a drug operation. He faced up to 25 years to life in prison had he been convicted at trial.
Several members of the GS9 Crew have already been convicted for the same set of charges.
Alex “A-Rod” Crandon was sentenced to 3 1/3 years in prisons, in May

Alex “A-Rod” Crandon, 22, member of Bobby Shmurda’s GS9 gang slammed with 53 1/3 years in prison for murder

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Rashid Derissant who was sentenced to 98 1/3 years for his role inn the gs9 gang
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Rashid Derissant, 24, (left) a gangster withh ties to rapper Bobby Smurda (right and insert), was given 98-year prison term after being found guilty of a string of gang-related charges

during sentencing, Manhattan Supreme Court Justice Abraham Clott ripped 22-year-old Alex Crandon who participated in a murder, shootings and other violent ordeals that terrorized East Flatbush over a two year period.
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Clott, who earlier that week sentenced Rashid Derissant, 24, to 98 years in prison, dismissed Crandon’s dispassionate pleas for sympathy as he mumbled through a statement.
“Please allow me the opportunity to become a productive citizen and raise my daughter to become one also,” he said.
Alex “A-Rod” Crandon and Rashid “Rasha” Derissant, are the two members of the gang charged with the killing of a member of rival gang, “Brooklyn’s Most Wanted,” on Feb. 8, 2013, outside a Brooklyn bodega.

 

 

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‘ Land Of Promise’:  TY Bello Releases New Song, ‘ Land Of Promise’ (It Is Well). Listen To Song & Full Lyrics

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The prolific singer, songwriter and ace photographer TY Bello has once again blessed us with a simple but deeply enriching song titled ‘ Land of Promise- It Is Well’.

In a short post on her Instagram page, she recalls the last time she shared music online as a scary beautiful day, just on her way to deliver her miraculous twin boys. Thanking God for coming through for her, she hopes that this song blesses the heart of everyone who listens to it.

 

The soulful nature and lyrics of this song brings a lot of beautiful memories and scratches the seal covering our tin of nostalgia; it is modern and futuristic and  puts into perspective the hope of things to come. See full lyrics below and follow link to listen.

TY BELLO
LAND OF PROMISE {IT IS WELL}
This land of promise
Is now home for me
Its now home for me
I believe I receive
That this land of promise
Where I stand to be blessed
Now home for me
Now home for me I believe I believe
This land of Glory
Is the land of my dreams
This land of peace
It is well It is well
Awake oh beauty
You have not been forsaken
You know who you are
Beautiful land
It is well it is well
Chorus:
It is well
It is well with us
It is well
It is well It is well
Bridge:
Tell your daughters
And call you sons to speak to the land
Declare it as one
Do not be afraid x4
Verse 2:
Calling you land of promise
We call out your grace
We declare your harvest
It is well It is well It is well
Awake oh beauty
You have not been forsaken
You know who you are
Beautiful land
It is well It is well
Chorus:
It is well
It is well with us
It is well
It is well It is well
Awake oh beauty
You have not been forsaken
You know who you are
Beautiful land oh oh oh
It is well x3
It is well and you know
Outro:
Tell your daughters
And call you sons to speak to the land
Declare it as one
Do not be afraid x4
Do not be afraid to say
It is well with the future
You know it is well
For the sake of our children
Speak to the land
We are not afraid x4
In this land where God says yes
Oh it is well.

Produced by: Mela
Mixed and mastered by Mr. Wols
Background Vocals: Nwando Omosebi, Abigail Bassey, Oshoboke Adejumoke and Awosika Olarewaju
Drums: Akintayo Adeyemo
Guitar: Olasehinde Oluwasegun
Piano: George Ade-Alao
Keys: Victor Sunday
Photography : Ria Solanke
Graphic Design : Anny Robert

Sound cloud link: https://soundcloud.com/tybellomusic/land-of-promise-it-is-well

“Sudanese Supremes” @45, Sisters Amal, Hadia and Hayat Talsam were known in their 1970s heyday

Sisters Amal, Hadia and Hayat Talsam were known in their 1970s heyday as the “Sudanese Supremes” 
’45 years on they are ready to take global stage by storm’

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Stepping onto a Khartoum stage and launching into their first song, The Nightingales, Sudan’s best-loved girl band,  still raise whoops and cheers from adoring fans, 45 years after their debut.
Sisters Amal, Hadia and Hayat Talsam were known in their 1970s heyday as the “Sudanese Supremes” for their stylish bobs, matching dresses and their soulful ballads, changing the image of female artists in Sudan forever.
Their outfits may have changed a little , at the January concert in Khartoum, the sisters appeared in long robes and loose headscarves, but the audience’s adoration has only increased, with fans dancing and singing in front of the stage.

 

Their vintage brand of Sudanese pop, songs of longing and youth blending elements of folk music with their driving vocals aim to show the world another side to Sudan.
“We want to travel the globe and offer our art to all the peoples of the world,” Amal said after the concert at the family home, sitting beside her sisters.
“We could show a beautiful side of Sudan to the outside world” said Hadia, the oldest of the sisters, grinning.
Although they haven’t got round to planning their tour, they do have some prior experience.

 ‘Vibrant period’

The Nightingales were formed in 1971, when a family friend came to their home in Omdurman, Khartoum’s twin city, to ask their father if he could pick three of his seven daughters to perform a song he wrote.
The trio performed so well that they made the arrangement permanent and they were picked to tour Sudan with president Jafer al-Nimeiri, a socialist-leaning army officer who seized power in 1969.
“It was a very, very vibrant period for culture and art,” said Hayat, the quietest of the sisters.
Amal said she was 15, Hadia 17 and Hayat just 13 years old when they started touring, building a region-wide fan base.
But in socially conservative 1970s Sudan, not everyone was pleased at the three young women travelling unaccompanied and singing and dancing in front of crowds.
But the sisters won acceptance by force of character and with support from their family.
“The Nightingales changed the way people looked at female artists in Sudan,” said Hadia.
The group did nothing to change their looks and even appeared on the state broadcaster performing their songs.
Other female artists had preceded them but their music had been more traditional.
Neighbours, friends and even some relatives criticised their father for their on-stage and television appearances as their fame grew.
“Our father wasn’t interested in any of that and he used to encourage us a lot,” Hadia said proudly.
“We were able to stand firm and fight back against people who were against us and our progress and our presence on stage proved that there was nothing wrong with it,” Amal added.
By the 1980s, the group had cemented their reputation as one of the country’s best loved groups … but Sudan itself was changing.
Nimeiri grew increasingly paranoid and repressive toward the end of his 16-year reign, declaring sharia Islamic law in 1983 and igniting another civil war with southern rebels.

 ‘Better than the Supremes’

The Nightingales kept playing but in 1988, with all three married and other commitments, they played their final concert in Khartoum.
Amal and Hadia left for the Gulf with their families, before moving to the US, while Hayat stayed in Khartoum.
The next year, now-president Omar al-Bashir seized power in an Islamist-backed coup and his military authorities imposed a curfew that lasted for years, putting limits on musical performances.
But in 2007, Hadia and Amal performed in New York’s Central Park at a festival of Sudanese music and people urged them to return to Sudan for a full reunion.
Apprehensively, Hadia and Amal returned the next year and organised a concert with Hayat at the officers’ club in central Khartoum, unsure whether their fans would remember them after 20 years.
When they arrived, the streets were jammed with expectant fans.
“The only thing that changed was they liked it much more and it was a huge success,” Amal said.
Now, the Nightingales tour Sudan when they are all in the country together, drawing hundreds of spectators of all ages to their shows across Khartoum.
They have lost none of their glamour, singing in matching outfits, with performances punctuated by mid-set costume changes — and a quick cigarette break.
Amal, Hadia and Hayat are confident they can win more fans abroad and are keen to arrange their tour.
And would the comparison with the Supremes help draw foreign crowds in?
“Honey, we’re better than the Supremes,” Amal shot back in American-accented English. “We came to their country, but they never came here”.article-doc-9u20y-1cbpi5jabl560086c6d8fb95b6a5-86_634x415

Photo: Ashraf Shazly /AFP
Sisters Amal, Hadia and Hayat Talsam were known in their 1970s heydey as the “Sudanese Supremes”
article-doc-9u20y-2oyr8x2fap50a802cebb4135ab17-708_634x422
Photo: Ashraf Shazly /AFP
The Nightingales’ vintage brand of Sudanese pop, songs of longing and youth blending elements of folk music aim to show the world another side to Sudan
article-doc-9u20y-2oyr8x2fap50a802cebb4135ace2-418_634x435
Photo: Tom Little/AFP
Amal Talsam, a member of Sudanese band The Nightingales, holds a picture of herself when the band started in the early 1970s

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